newstatesman:

Why Beyoncé’s VMA performance was feminism’s most powerful pop culture moment.
elizabethminkel:

NOT LONG NOW.
But while I’m here, I have a kind of surprising number of new followers! I know I wound up in the trending section of tumblr after my stint liveblogging the George R.R. Martin/Robin Hobb event? IDK. But hi guys! I can’t tell you how much I appreciate it.
I don’t know if you’re all Doctor Who fans or not? (don’t worry if you’re not; I’m just excited about Capaldi. I’ll go back to a broader fannish tumblr super soon). But if you are, can I shamelessly plug the piece I wrote a few days ago? 
“The global force of Doctor Who: what does Britain’s biggest cultural export tell the world?”
It’s for the newstatesman: my first proper fan column after the introductory one. I love thinking about the way cultural products get exported and consumed…. mostly I just love thinking about Capaldi’s eyebrows, though. 
I’m off to carolinecrampton's flat to watch “Deep Breath” (SO EXCITED). Wherever you're watching it in the world, I hope you have a wonderful evening.

I am currently butchering a butternut squash in honour of this occasion.

elizabethminkel:

NOT LONG NOW.

But while I’m here, I have a kind of surprising number of new followers! I know I wound up in the trending section of tumblr after my stint liveblogging the George R.R. Martin/Robin Hobb event? IDK. But hi guys! I can’t tell you how much I appreciate it.

I don’t know if you’re all Doctor Who fans or not? (don’t worry if you’re not; I’m just excited about Capaldi. I’ll go back to a broader fannish tumblr super soon). But if you are, can I shamelessly plug the piece I wrote a few days ago? 

The global force of Doctor Who: what does Britain’s biggest cultural export tell the world?

It’s for the newstatesman: my first proper fan column after the introductory one. I love thinking about the way cultural products get exported and consumed…. mostly I just love thinking about Capaldi’s eyebrows, though. 

I’m off to carolinecrampton's flat to watch “Deep Breath” (SO EXCITED). Wherever you're watching it in the world, I hope you have a wonderful evening.

I am currently butchering a butternut squash in honour of this occasion.

cleowho:

"How do I look?"
The Underwater Menace - season 04 - 1967

Very excited about CapalDay, but thought I’d just take a second to remind you all of the excellence that went before (see above). cleowho:

"How do I look?"
The Underwater Menace - season 04 - 1967

Very excited about CapalDay, but thought I’d just take a second to remind you all of the excellence that went before (see above). cleowho:

"How do I look?"
The Underwater Menace - season 04 - 1967

Very excited about CapalDay, but thought I’d just take a second to remind you all of the excellence that went before (see above). cleowho:

"How do I look?"
The Underwater Menace - season 04 - 1967

Very excited about CapalDay, but thought I’d just take a second to remind you all of the excellence that went before (see above). cleowho:

"How do I look?"
The Underwater Menace - season 04 - 1967

Very excited about CapalDay, but thought I’d just take a second to remind you all of the excellence that went before (see above). cleowho:

"How do I look?"
The Underwater Menace - season 04 - 1967

Very excited about CapalDay, but thought I’d just take a second to remind you all of the excellence that went before (see above).

cleowho:

"How do I look?"

The Underwater Menace - season 04 - 1967

Very excited about CapalDay, but thought I’d just take a second to remind you all of the excellence that went before (see above).

newstatesman:

Did Lauren Bacall always get the roles she deserved? carolinecrampton on the screen legend, who has died at the age of 89.

In 2011, Lauren Bacall told Vanity Fair that “I don’t think anybody that has a brain can really be happy.” I’m not sure that she was a very happy person (but who is, honestly?), and I also think that she was cheated of the chance to do her best work because of the way Hollywood, and the world, insisted on viewing her always as the adjunct to a more famous man. Anyway, I wrote about it about this morning after her death was announced, and now I’m going to order To Have and Have Not and Murder on the Orient Express (my two personal favourites - the latter has Ingrid Bergman and John Gielgud in too!) so I can have my own mini Bacall film fest this weekend. newstatesman:

Did Lauren Bacall always get the roles she deserved? carolinecrampton on the screen legend, who has died at the age of 89.

In 2011, Lauren Bacall told Vanity Fair that “I don’t think anybody that has a brain can really be happy.” I’m not sure that she was a very happy person (but who is, honestly?), and I also think that she was cheated of the chance to do her best work because of the way Hollywood, and the world, insisted on viewing her always as the adjunct to a more famous man. Anyway, I wrote about it about this morning after her death was announced, and now I’m going to order To Have and Have Not and Murder on the Orient Express (my two personal favourites - the latter has Ingrid Bergman and John Gielgud in too!) so I can have my own mini Bacall film fest this weekend. newstatesman:

Did Lauren Bacall always get the roles she deserved? carolinecrampton on the screen legend, who has died at the age of 89.

In 2011, Lauren Bacall told Vanity Fair that “I don’t think anybody that has a brain can really be happy.” I’m not sure that she was a very happy person (but who is, honestly?), and I also think that she was cheated of the chance to do her best work because of the way Hollywood, and the world, insisted on viewing her always as the adjunct to a more famous man. Anyway, I wrote about it about this morning after her death was announced, and now I’m going to order To Have and Have Not and Murder on the Orient Express (my two personal favourites - the latter has Ingrid Bergman and John Gielgud in too!) so I can have my own mini Bacall film fest this weekend. newstatesman:

Did Lauren Bacall always get the roles she deserved? carolinecrampton on the screen legend, who has died at the age of 89.

In 2011, Lauren Bacall told Vanity Fair that “I don’t think anybody that has a brain can really be happy.” I’m not sure that she was a very happy person (but who is, honestly?), and I also think that she was cheated of the chance to do her best work because of the way Hollywood, and the world, insisted on viewing her always as the adjunct to a more famous man. Anyway, I wrote about it about this morning after her death was announced, and now I’m going to order To Have and Have Not and Murder on the Orient Express (my two personal favourites - the latter has Ingrid Bergman and John Gielgud in too!) so I can have my own mini Bacall film fest this weekend. newstatesman:

Did Lauren Bacall always get the roles she deserved? carolinecrampton on the screen legend, who has died at the age of 89.

In 2011, Lauren Bacall told Vanity Fair that “I don’t think anybody that has a brain can really be happy.” I’m not sure that she was a very happy person (but who is, honestly?), and I also think that she was cheated of the chance to do her best work because of the way Hollywood, and the world, insisted on viewing her always as the adjunct to a more famous man. Anyway, I wrote about it about this morning after her death was announced, and now I’m going to order To Have and Have Not and Murder on the Orient Express (my two personal favourites - the latter has Ingrid Bergman and John Gielgud in too!) so I can have my own mini Bacall film fest this weekend. newstatesman:

Did Lauren Bacall always get the roles she deserved? carolinecrampton on the screen legend, who has died at the age of 89.

In 2011, Lauren Bacall told Vanity Fair that “I don’t think anybody that has a brain can really be happy.” I’m not sure that she was a very happy person (but who is, honestly?), and I also think that she was cheated of the chance to do her best work because of the way Hollywood, and the world, insisted on viewing her always as the adjunct to a more famous man. Anyway, I wrote about it about this morning after her death was announced, and now I’m going to order To Have and Have Not and Murder on the Orient Express (my two personal favourites - the latter has Ingrid Bergman and John Gielgud in too!) so I can have my own mini Bacall film fest this weekend. newstatesman:

Did Lauren Bacall always get the roles she deserved? carolinecrampton on the screen legend, who has died at the age of 89.

In 2011, Lauren Bacall told Vanity Fair that “I don’t think anybody that has a brain can really be happy.” I’m not sure that she was a very happy person (but who is, honestly?), and I also think that she was cheated of the chance to do her best work because of the way Hollywood, and the world, insisted on viewing her always as the adjunct to a more famous man. Anyway, I wrote about it about this morning after her death was announced, and now I’m going to order To Have and Have Not and Murder on the Orient Express (my two personal favourites - the latter has Ingrid Bergman and John Gielgud in too!) so I can have my own mini Bacall film fest this weekend. newstatesman:

Did Lauren Bacall always get the roles she deserved? carolinecrampton on the screen legend, who has died at the age of 89.

In 2011, Lauren Bacall told Vanity Fair that “I don’t think anybody that has a brain can really be happy.” I’m not sure that she was a very happy person (but who is, honestly?), and I also think that she was cheated of the chance to do her best work because of the way Hollywood, and the world, insisted on viewing her always as the adjunct to a more famous man. Anyway, I wrote about it about this morning after her death was announced, and now I’m going to order To Have and Have Not and Murder on the Orient Express (my two personal favourites - the latter has Ingrid Bergman and John Gielgud in too!) so I can have my own mini Bacall film fest this weekend. newstatesman:

Did Lauren Bacall always get the roles she deserved? carolinecrampton on the screen legend, who has died at the age of 89.

In 2011, Lauren Bacall told Vanity Fair that “I don’t think anybody that has a brain can really be happy.” I’m not sure that she was a very happy person (but who is, honestly?), and I also think that she was cheated of the chance to do her best work because of the way Hollywood, and the world, insisted on viewing her always as the adjunct to a more famous man. Anyway, I wrote about it about this morning after her death was announced, and now I’m going to order To Have and Have Not and Murder on the Orient Express (my two personal favourites - the latter has Ingrid Bergman and John Gielgud in too!) so I can have my own mini Bacall film fest this weekend. newstatesman:

Did Lauren Bacall always get the roles she deserved? carolinecrampton on the screen legend, who has died at the age of 89.

In 2011, Lauren Bacall told Vanity Fair that “I don’t think anybody that has a brain can really be happy.” I’m not sure that she was a very happy person (but who is, honestly?), and I also think that she was cheated of the chance to do her best work because of the way Hollywood, and the world, insisted on viewing her always as the adjunct to a more famous man. Anyway, I wrote about it about this morning after her death was announced, and now I’m going to order To Have and Have Not and Murder on the Orient Express (my two personal favourites - the latter has Ingrid Bergman and John Gielgud in too!) so I can have my own mini Bacall film fest this weekend.

newstatesman:

Did Lauren Bacall always get the roles she deserved? carolinecrampton on the screen legend, who has died at the age of 89.

In 2011, Lauren Bacall told Vanity Fair that “I don’t think anybody that has a brain can really be happy.” I’m not sure that she was a very happy person (but who is, honestly?), and I also think that she was cheated of the chance to do her best work because of the way Hollywood, and the world, insisted on viewing her always as the adjunct to a more famous man. Anyway, I wrote about it about this morning after her death was announced, and now I’m going to order To Have and Have Not and Murder on the Orient Express (my two personal favourites - the latter has Ingrid Bergman and John Gielgud in too!) so I can have my own mini Bacall film fest this weekend.

"I’ve an opera here that you shan’t escape / on miles and miles of recorded tape…"

I’m trying to buy new headphones at the moment, and the bewildering array of acronyms and ways of differentiating sound quality remeind me of this, by Flanders and Swann: “Song of Reproduction”.

“Ironically, it was in pop and rock in the 60s and 70s that the truly immutable masterpieces were conceived and made, the albums-as-artworks that were made in studios and created for the medium of the LP, and which exist, definitively, in that format rather than on the live stage or as a series of suggestions for future interpretations of the same musical material. Classical music, on the other hand – above all, of course, the repertoires of anything composed in the pre-recording era - was never meant to be turned into a single perfected realisation of anything: these musical “works” – whether they’re Bach’s Passions or Mendelssohn’s symphonies or Chopin’s piano music – are more like assemblages of musical possibility, which exist as the sum total of their scores, their editions, their range of interpretative choices, and even their range of representations in writing, thinking, and listening to and about them.”
— Tom Service explains why he thinks streaming and the internet are doing wonderful things for classical music.

originalwolfgirl:

Let’s be honest, the real question isn’t “To be or not to be?”, it’s what is Benedict’s Hamlet hair going to look like?…

Ballet dancers pick the moves they find hardest.

Turns out, ballet dancers are also really good at understatement.

Right! Let’s get this show on the road!

projectparadesend:

How’s that reading coming along? Is everyone ready to have a go at Some Do Not, part one? We can’t wait. Speaking for myself, I’m really enjoying it so far.

A word about logistics:

We’ve been emailing back and forth amongst ourselves here at PPE HQ, and thinking about how to do this, because we’ve got A LOT of people who want to play and we think that’s awesome, but we’ve been wondering how best to facilitate matters from this hub. Here’s what we’ve come up with:

In the next day or so, we (unreconstuctedfangirl/jslilley, elizabethminkel, jasonstieber, and carolinecrampton) will post some initial thoughts, discussion topics or questions that we thought might be interesting to tackle. We’re going to tag all of our post with “project Parades End” and “Some Do Not part 1”, which should make them easy to follow and easy to block if you aren’t yet there and don’t want to be spoiled. In addition, we’ll be creating our own topic tags to make it easy to track different topics. So, let’s say someone posts a discussion of class relationships in the novel — they might tag the post “class in Parade’s End”, etc., and then you can follow/block the discussion you dig/don’t dig.

What we’d like to ask you to do:

It would be just the splendidest if all of you participants in the discussion would make sure to keep the tags when you post and use them when you reply or post your own ideas, so that the threads of each part of the book and topic are easy to track and follow, even when we all post replies and etc. under our own names, and so that we can track the tags and find and reblog all the interesting ideas we see.

Additionally!

We opened a submissions box on our blog, so that you can submit topics and ideas to us directly as well, though please do read the terms of submission.

And with that, let’s do this!

image

I’m genuinely excited at the idea of multiple and intersecting topic tags. But then I am a massive taxonomy nerd. I will post my discussion thoughts soon.

veraionica:

Café Scene”, c.1946, Raphael Soyer. (via)

(via stainedpoems)

Peter O’Toole, who would have been 82 today, once made the best entrance on a chat show ever seen by human eyes.

His face.

it’s all culture

elizabethminkel:

When I was, oh, maybe 16, I went to Borders to seek out the CD box set of Andrea Chénier, an opera by Italian composer Umberto Giordano. [Side note: I believe my great-grandparents were Giordanos so I’ve just decided I’m related to this guy.] Borders was our local bookstore, funny to think of it now, the kind of “big box store becomes vibrant community space with no viable independent option” and it’s where I spent a good portion of the money I earned folding khakis at the GAP. It was sad to come back to my hometown and see the hulking shell of the two-story brick store on Broadway the past few years. Now, weirdly, it’s a kind of cheesy-looking marketing agency, and an independent bookstore has finally come to town, just across the street.

OK WAIT this wasn’t supposed to be about Borders. But it is sort of about Borders. You know how they had all those coupons? Buy one and we will shove nineteen free ones in your hands? You know how they had everything? It felt like they did. They’d order it for you from another store if they didn’t. I know, I should’ve gone to the library more often (I did almost exclusively before I had a job), but I kind of had this sense that every book or CD I purchased would be read multiple times or listened to on repeat.

This turned out to be largely true. My teenage years were a series of obsessive curiosities, one linking to the next. I’ve got such strong attachments, in my mind, to that Borders. Marching in there, on a mission. Tucked up in its corners. Trying on a million different skins, picking up a book that just might help me figure out which skin I’d eventually wear. The place where I spent my midnights decked out in house robes, waiting for Harry Potter with a giant crowd. Or years before, where I ran, after reading a borrowed copy of the Sorcerer’s Stone, to buy the Chamber of Secrets. There’s such a charged intimacy in that memory. It was November and it was already snowing and I devoured it. And the next one. And the next.

Read More

A big cheer for this from me – it’s sort of what I was trying to get at when I wrote about theatre snobs “clap-shaming” Martin Freeman fans at Richard III a few weeks ago. There’s no “hierachy of reference” that makes coming to a book via a critical bibliography better than coming to it via a TV series. You’re still reading the same book, and are equally entitled to enjoy and discuss it.

“I didn’t write the book because it was a book about betrayal that could only be facilitated by my betrayal of other people, many of whom had already been betrayed. This wouldn’t have been a clever metatextual commentary on the nature of betrayal; it would have just been really quite mean of me, and sad.”