composersdoingnormalshit:

Krzysztof Penderecki hiding behind a door.

composersdoingnormalshit:

Krzysztof Penderecki hiding behind a door.

carolinecrampton:

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projectparadesend:

Hey internet, want to read Ford Madox Ford’s great modernist World War I / war of the sexes novel — or rather, tetralogy — together over the internet? We’re doing it, and we’d love for you to join in if the idea appeals to you…

I’m going to…

OMG we can be page-number buddies. Weird that Foyle’s only had the massive academic edition, though - I’ve never had that problem in there before. Maybe moving into the shiny new bookshop has given them pretensions.

unreconstructedfangirl, can we post you a copy, maybe? It can’t be that much to send a paperback to Prague…

Project Parade’s End: want to join us?

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projectparadesend:

Hey internet, want to read Ford Madox Ford’s great modernist World War I / war of the sexes novel — or rather, tetralogy — together over the internet? We’re doing it, and we’d love for you to join in if the idea appeals to you.

Here are some details about our project / internet reading group:

  • What exactly are we doing? Reading and discussing the books, and also thinking about how they interact with the BBC’s 2012 adaption.
  • How can you join up? First, get the book and start reading! It’s available here for free. Then, either drop us a line, letting us know you’d like to be involved, reblog this post to give us a signal boost while letting us know you’re into it, or just post something to your own tumblr and tag the post with “project parade’s end” so we can track it / reblog it.
  • What’s going to happen next? Well, within the next week, we will start posting questions / discussion topics / thoughts about the novel as we read it, and hope to get some discussion going. If you feel inspired to contribute, you are warmly invited to do so!

One final note: two of us are coming at this after having seen and been completely floored by the recent BBC adaptation, and by Benedict Cumberbatch’s rather amazing turn as Christopher Tietjens, while one of us has not seen it, and is coming at the novel fresh and virtuously untouched by all that. What I mean to say is this: both perspectives are very welcome here.

If you are interested in reading this novel with us, we want you to know that there is is room for serious book-talk, and room to express how besotted you might justifiably be by the mini-series with relation to the book, or even just to wax lyrical over the amazing way the characters in the book were brought to life by actors and actresses who are easy on the eyes. Either approach is valued, and to be perfectly clear, we love to talk seriously about stories, but we also do not look down our noses at fangirl (or boy) squee.

So… that’s it! I do hope some of you will want to play. Nudge, nudge!

I’m going to be helping out with projectparadesend in the coming weeks and months. My reasons for doing so:

1. I’ll finally actually read the whole of Ford Madox Ford’s tetrology (in my post-BBC adaptation enthusiasm, I only made it as far as the end of Some Do Not…, the first part).

2. I’d like to be better at using tumblr, get talking to some interesting people, and stop being such a lurker.

3. This seems like an excellent chance to share my enjoyment of Benedict Cumberbatch gifs with others.

So, if you’re interested in taking part, follow the project blog and stay tuned. I went and bought my copy this morning (see above). Go and get yours!

unreconstructedfangirl:

carolinecrampton:

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David Mitchell is tweeting a short story this week, set in the same universe as his forthcoming novel The Bone Clocks. Be still my beating heart.

(There will be more on how much I love his writing in the next few months, I swear.)

WHAT??? LE SWOON!

(Hi Caroline! I love his writing so much, too.)

You too? I’ll be honest, I think I’ve read The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet at least five times, even though it takes me ages. Time well spent, imo.

When I first met Jeannie [Campbell, his third wife] we stared at each other full of murderous rage for an hour without blinking, then we got married.

[Pictured: Norman Mailer, Mrs Hemingway and Lady Jeanne Campbell]

David Mitchell is tweeting a short story this week, set in the same universe as his forthcoming novel The Bone Clocks. Be still my beating heart.

(There will be more on how much I love his writing in the next few months, I swear.)

“[Alain] De Botton is the celebrated author of a series of books that flatten great literature into self-help literature and philosophy into tasty little homilies for the haute bourgeoisie. He is what Oprah Winfrey would have been if she had read The World as Will and Representation. His books may be the most complacent books I have ever read. In his many accounts of the struggle for existence there is no evidence of the struggle, not a shred. Instead there is a TED-like self-congratulation: a brush with an idea followed by an overwhelming sensation of coolness and depth. In London he has established an institution called the School of Life, which offers its paying students the opportunity to feel as lovely and as psychologically integrated as its founder. Its website must be seen to be believed. Woody Allen’s people would have graduated from the School of Life with honors.”
— I don’t really care what Leon Wieseltier thinks of Twitter, but his views on Alain de Botton are very enjoyable.
“All I wanted was to eat the chicken that is smarter than other chickens, and to absorb some of its power. And make a nice kiev.”
— Red was already my favourite character on Orange Is The New Black, but then her existential thoughts on chicken took it to whole other level.

I had a very nice holiday. So nice that coming home felt like being uprooted and transplanted into a different kind of reality.

“The face of human progress wears bright ribbons in its hair and swings a bag of books.”

acehotel:

Running through The Louvre, from Bernardo Bertolucci’s The Dreamers. 

Today the filmmaker turns 74. And to this day The Louvre forbids running.

(via avantblargh)

Understanding what Derrida was on about…

Deconstruction is all about interrogating apparently unproblematic terms. It’s like digging a hole in the middle of the ocean with a shovel made of water.

I did three years of English Literature at university, and not once did anybody explain what Derrida was up to as clearly as Louis Menand did in this piece about Paul de Man in the New Yorker. I feel cheated, somehow.

“Since her illness began, at least in the intervals when she felt well enough to read, she had immersed herself in books almost fanatically, trying not to leave open any chink in her consciousness through which she could be waylaid by awareness of her body or by fear or disgust. She read only fiction, not history or politics, and nothing experimental or difficult that would require her to pause for reflection or argument. She had read a lot of novels recently that she would have disdained in the past.”
— From “Under the Sign of the Moon” by Tessa Hadley in the New Yorker.
"The First Georgians" at the Queen’s Gallery is rather good - portraits of Electress Sophie, Caroline of Ansbach, numerous Georges, a few exciting clocks…

…and a woman in a cape who got extremely damp in a downpour on the way home. "The First Georgians" at the Queen’s Gallery is rather good - portraits of Electress Sophie, Caroline of Ansbach, numerous Georges, a few exciting clocks…

…and a woman in a cape who got extremely damp in a downpour on the way home. "The First Georgians" at the Queen’s Gallery is rather good - portraits of Electress Sophie, Caroline of Ansbach, numerous Georges, a few exciting clocks…

…and a woman in a cape who got extremely damp in a downpour on the way home. "The First Georgians" at the Queen’s Gallery is rather good - portraits of Electress Sophie, Caroline of Ansbach, numerous Georges, a few exciting clocks…

…and a woman in a cape who got extremely damp in a downpour on the way home. "The First Georgians" at the Queen’s Gallery is rather good - portraits of Electress Sophie, Caroline of Ansbach, numerous Georges, a few exciting clocks…

…and a woman in a cape who got extremely damp in a downpour on the way home. "The First Georgians" at the Queen’s Gallery is rather good - portraits of Electress Sophie, Caroline of Ansbach, numerous Georges, a few exciting clocks…

…and a woman in a cape who got extremely damp in a downpour on the way home. "The First Georgians" at the Queen’s Gallery is rather good - portraits of Electress Sophie, Caroline of Ansbach, numerous Georges, a few exciting clocks…

…and a woman in a cape who got extremely damp in a downpour on the way home. "The First Georgians" at the Queen’s Gallery is rather good - portraits of Electress Sophie, Caroline of Ansbach, numerous Georges, a few exciting clocks…

…and a woman in a cape who got extremely damp in a downpour on the way home. "The First Georgians" at the Queen’s Gallery is rather good - portraits of Electress Sophie, Caroline of Ansbach, numerous Georges, a few exciting clocks…

…and a woman in a cape who got extremely damp in a downpour on the way home. "The First Georgians" at the Queen’s Gallery is rather good - portraits of Electress Sophie, Caroline of Ansbach, numerous Georges, a few exciting clocks…

…and a woman in a cape who got extremely damp in a downpour on the way home.

"The First Georgians" at the Queen’s Gallery is rather good - portraits of Electress Sophie, Caroline of Ansbach, numerous Georges, a few exciting clocks…

…and a woman in a cape who got extremely damp in a downpour on the way home.

I am honestly never going to get tired of this.

I am honestly never going to get tired of this.