If I was a borrower, I think I’d quite like to move into the inside of a stringed instrument. These photographs by Mierswa Kluska for these Berliner Philharmoniker posters are mesmerising. If I was a borrower, I think I’d quite like to move into the inside of a stringed instrument. These photographs by Mierswa Kluska for these Berliner Philharmoniker posters are mesmerising. If I was a borrower, I think I’d quite like to move into the inside of a stringed instrument. These photographs by Mierswa Kluska for these Berliner Philharmoniker posters are mesmerising.

If I was a borrower, I think I’d quite like to move into the inside of a stringed instrument. These photographs by Mierswa Kluska for these Berliner Philharmoniker posters are mesmerising.

First Poem of the Morning

By Ann Nadge

When you and I wave
I wonder if for you
the stranger across

three gray rooftops
over the blackbirds
pecking the softening

skylight rim of morning
through the shapes
of blackened branches

on the other side
of the ice-paned
lane window

I wonder if for you
our wave is the first
poem of the morning

The Royal Ballet from the perspective of a pointe shoe.

“When we first moved in, my wife was still my girlfriend. We were engaged by the end of the first shower curtain cycle, married by the second, and entered the third cycle as we had our first kid. Will we have a second child before I change the curtains again?”
“Rather, there are robust novelists (D.H. Lawrence), who announce their presence by busting down the front door of your literary consciousness to steal your electronics, and insinuating novelists (Willa Cather), who sneak in through a window after you’ve dozed off and raid your refrigerator.”

Bowling most likely originated in Germany around 300 A.D. as a religious ritual in which participants would roll stones at clubs to absolve their sins. The annals of history reveal little about where or how bowling gained traction, but according to written record, the sport was so popular in England by 1336, that King Edward III had to ban it to keep his troops focused on archery practice.

Years later, King Henry VIII would ban bowling again for everyone but the upper crust: it had supposedly infatuated the working class so much that they were neglecting their trades and impeding the financial progress of their counties. By the time bowling was introduced to the United States during the colonial era, it had developed a rapport with the “common” man.

— Who knew medieval monarchs felt so strongly about knocking a few pins over?

fyninasosanya:

Street photography by Blake Andrews.

“[Andrew] Hohman, who ate two thousand and eleven wings in 2011, said, “When I finished my last wing of the year, I slept with the bone under my pillow.””
— Americans can be really weird about food.
explore-blog:

A peek at Mozart’s musical diary from The British Library – a fine addition to the notebooks and sketchbooks of famous creators. Pair with what Mozart’s upbringing teaches us about the cultivation of genius.
(HT Open Culture) 

Singing in various choirs and (intermittently) practising the violin, I probably use pencil and paper to write on sheet music more than I do on paper, these days. Compared with my own scribbles, it shocks me how very clear and precise Mozart’s notation is - but then, I suppose, if he was slapdash, the musicians wouldn’t play his music correctly. explore-blog:

A peek at Mozart’s musical diary from The British Library – a fine addition to the notebooks and sketchbooks of famous creators. Pair with what Mozart’s upbringing teaches us about the cultivation of genius.
(HT Open Culture) 

Singing in various choirs and (intermittently) practising the violin, I probably use pencil and paper to write on sheet music more than I do on paper, these days. Compared with my own scribbles, it shocks me how very clear and precise Mozart’s notation is - but then, I suppose, if he was slapdash, the musicians wouldn’t play his music correctly.

explore-blog:

A peek at Mozart’s musical diary from The British Library – a fine addition to the notebooks and sketchbooks of famous creators. Pair with what Mozart’s upbringing teaches us about the cultivation of genius.

(HT Open Culture

Singing in various choirs and (intermittently) practising the violin, I probably use pencil and paper to write on sheet music more than I do on paper, these days. Compared with my own scribbles, it shocks me how very clear and precise Mozart’s notation is - but then, I suppose, if he was slapdash, the musicians wouldn’t play his music correctly.

I watched Robocop for the first time on Valentine’s Day this year. I’m probably the last person in the world to say this, but it’s a bloody fantastic film. This is the original artwork for it, as posted by @Criterion on Twitter.

I’m reading Elizabeth Abbott’s great Mistresses: A History of the Other Woman at the moment, and in the section on Madame de Pompadour, I came across something I’d never heard before:

At his son the dauphin’s wedding celebration, Louis, dressed a yew tree, turned his attention to Reinette [aka Madame de Pompadour], glamorous and elegant as the goddess Diana, and hovered around her for the entire evening. Soon after, she became his mistress.

Louis XV seduced his soon-to-be maitresse en titre while dressed as a bit of shrubbery. Eighteenth century France was weird.

[The Yew Tree Ball, 1745. Image: Wikimedia Commons]

composersdoingnormalshit:

Francis Poulenc cuddling his dog.
I just don’t think Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s Google Doodle should be pink. After all, this was the woman who wrote:And cold before my summer’s done, And deaf in Nature’s general tune, And fallen too low for special fear, And here, with hope no longer here, While the tears drop, my days go on.

She’s not a very pastel poet, is she?
I just don’t think Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s Google Doodle should be pink. After all, this was the woman who wrote:

And cold before my summer’s done,
And deaf in Nature’s general tune,
And fallen too low for special fear,
And here, with hope no longer here,
While the tears drop, my days go on.

She’s not a very pastel poet, is she?
“As the list of trigger warning–worthy topics continues to grow, there’s scant research demonstrating how words “trigger” or how warnings might help. Most psychological research on P.S.T.D. suggests that, for those who have experienced trauma, “triggers” can be complex and unpredictable, appearing in many forms, from sounds to smells to weather conditions and times of the year. In this sense, anything can be a trigger —a musky cologne, a ditsy pop song, a footprint in the snow.”
— On memory and triggers - a very thought-provoking piece by Jenny Jarvie in the New Republic, which productively discusses the “how far is too far” question. As someone who once tried to walk up a down escalator on the Tube to get away from someone who was wearing a cologne an ex favoured, I’m particularly interested in the real-life examples.
Whispering this, just in case… I think I might have become one of those People Who Runs. It’s only been a few weeks, but I’ve already found myself mentally sifting my plans for each week, trying to find the gaps when I can stick on a hoodie and get out the door.

Whispering this, just in case… I think I might have become one of those People Who Runs. It’s only been a few weeks, but I’ve already found myself mentally sifting my plans for each week, trying to find the gaps when I can stick on a hoodie and get out the door.

(via joyrunning)